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Growing up near Venice, Simone Crestani had the unique opportunity at a young age to get a close look at the famed glass artisans of Murano. At 15, he took up the craft himself, studying under master glassblower Massimo Lunardon. Soon, he began to develop his own methods of sculpting glass, using strong, high-heat flames to melt the glass and form it into the desired shapes. His main inspiration for his sculptures comes from nature, and his work shows flowing, organic forms.

Polpo

<i>Polpo</i>

Glass Bonsai

<i>Glass Bonsai</i>

The Farm”s Democracy

<i>The Farm

Hanged Octopus

<i>Hanged Octopus</i>

Bunny

<i>Bunny</i>

The Hunting Heron

<i>The Hunting Heron</i>

Anemone Rosso

<i>Anemone Rosso</i>

Glass Bonsai Conversation

<i>Glass Bonsai Conversation</i>

Some of his work, like the pieces seen above, are purely decorative and conceptual, existing simply as themselves. Crestani”s trees and animals are full of personality, and his hanged creatures hint at deeper meanings and larger themes behind his work.

Besides these artistic pieces, Crestani also designs and creates functional items like glassware, dishes, containers, and light fixtures. These items, while obviously more functional, still have his signature organic shapes and detailing inspired by nature. Some, like the suspended vases below, even take some cues from his more conceptual work with their nooses. In bright colors and abstract shapes, though, the vases are a bit more playful than, say, a suspended rabbit.

Vasi Sospesi

<i>Vasi Sospesi</i>

(Suspended vases)

Tea set

Tea set

Serving platter

Serving platter

Pitcher and glasses

Pitcher and glasses

Oil container

Oil container

Chandelier

Chandelier

Chandelier

Chandelier

Crestani at work, using a flame to melt and form the glass sculptures.

Crestani at work, using a flame to melt and form the glass sculptures.

After years of practice, Crestani developed his own unique flameworking and glassblowing techniques to create his sculptures. The process of glassblowing is fascinating, but requires rigorous training as it can be quite dangerous. Today, Crestani”s work can be found in galleries in Paris, Milan, and New York. Crestani himself splits his time between Venice and Charlottesville, VA. You can see more of his work on his website, as well as on Facebook.

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