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Heads up, you English-speaking Cyrano de Bergerac”s out there: you”ve been doing it wrong. You think you love love? Your words of love may be soft and tender, but it turns out our language is simply falling behind when it comes to eloquently articulating our affections.

These 25 words from other languages across the globe sum up the unique and sometimes overwhelming emotions involved in romance: all the good, the bad, and even embarrassing feelings that make our hearts beat a little faster. Take a look before writing your next love note.

1. “Mamihlapinatapai”

Yaghan: When two people look at each other and hope the other will make a move, but both being unlikely to do so.

2. “Saudade”

Portuguese: Melancholy nostalgia for someone or something from your past.

3. “Tuqburni”

Arabic: Literal translation is, “you bury me,” referring to a love so deep you can”t imagine living your life apart.

4. “Bakku-shan”

Japanese: A girl who is only deemed attractive from behind.

5. “Forelsket”

Norwegian: The euphoric feeling of falling in love for the first time.

6. “Cafune”

Portuguese: Running your hands through your loved one”s hair.

7. “Paasa”

Tagalog: Someone who, intentionally or not, leads another person on without any actual romantic interest.

8. “Kummerspeck”

German: Literally translates to, “grief bacon,” and refers to the excess weight you gain from emotional over-eating.

9. “Onsra”

Boro: Bittersweet feeling of knowing a love won”t last.

10. “La Douleur Exquise”

French: The “exquisite pain” of wanting someone you can”t have.

11. “Queesting”

Dutch: A verb used to decribe the act of inviting someone over strictly for pillow talk.

12. “Oodal”

Tamil: Sulking after a stupid fight.

13. “Kilig”

Tagalog: The rush you feel after something great happens, like bumping into your crush unexpectedly.

14. “Cavoli Riscaldati”

Italian: Literally, “reheated cabbage,” referencing an attempt to re-start a bad relationship.

15. “Buksvager”

Swedish: Someone who has had sex with a person you”ve also had sex with.

16. “Koi No Yokan”

Japanese: Almost love at sight, but not exactly.

17. “Gigil”

Tagalog: The undeniable urge to grab or pinch someone because they”re just so stinkin” cute.

18. “Iktsuarpok”

Inuit: The anticipation you feel while waiting for someone to show up at your house.

19. “Voorpret”

Dutch: Literally, “pre-fun,” the excitement leading up to something happening.

20. “Retrouvailles”

French: “Rediscovery,” or a reunion with someone you haven”t seen for a long time.

21. “Razbliuto”

Russian: The lingering sentimental feeling you have for someone you used to love.

22. “Viraag”

Hindi: The pain of being separated from someone you love.

23. “Fensterln”

German: The teenage act of climbing into each others windows to hide your activities from your parents.

24. “Layogenic”

Tagalog: When someone seems attractive from afar, but not so much on closer inspection.

25.) “Gretchenfrage”

25.)

German: A pointed question asked to reveal someone”s true intentions.

If only Elizabeth Barrett Browning had known about these, her poem could have been much longer.

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